Meet Sarah Weinman

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From time to time, I’ve linked to Marilyn Stasio’s Crime Column in The New York Times. Yesterday, the newspaper announced Sarah Weinman will be the new crime columnist. Here is the announcement from The New York Times.

New York Times : Sarah Weinman Becomes New Columnist for Crime Fiction as Marilyn Stasio Retires 02/12/2021 | 05:08am EST

We are delighted to announce that Sarah Weinman will be the new crime columnist for The New York Times Book Review. She was, of course, the most obvious suspect: Weinman is the author of ‘The Real Lolita: A Lost Girl, An Unthinkable Crime, and a Scandalous Masterpiece,’ and the editor of the anthologies ‘Unspeakable Acts: True Tales of Crime, Murder, Deceit & Obsession’ (Ecco), ‘Women Crime Writers: Eight Suspense Novels of the 1940s & 50s’ (Library of America) and ‘Troubled Daughters, Twisted Wives’ (Penguin). A National Magazine Award finalist for Reporting, Weinman has written for The Times, Vanity Fair, The Washington Post, New York magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and other publications, while her fiction has appeared in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine and various anthologies. Weinman also writes the ‘Crime Lady’ newsletter, covering crime fiction, true crime and all points in between. Her next book – about William F. Buckley’s ill-fated advocacy for a Death Row prisoner – will be published by Ecco in 2022.

Marilyn Stasio, who has written her extremely popular twice-monthly column since 1988, will continue to contribute reviews to The Times on crime, true crime and other related subjects. ‘Long before I came to work at The Times, I turned to Marilyn’s column for reading recommendations,’ says Tina Jordan, Stasio’s editor and the deputy editor of the Book Review. ‘She covered the fictional murder-and-mayhem landscape so thoroughly – not just books by big-name authors, but books in translation, books from small presses.’ In a 2017 interview with The Times on the occasion of Stasio’s 30th anniversary at the Book Review, Weinman noted that Stasio’s seriousness and longevity had transformed her into someone whom people ‘revere and fear.’Sarah Weinman’s first column appears online today and in our Feb. 14th issue.

Curious? You can order Sarah Weinman’s books through the Web Store. http://bit.ly/2PPeH7g